trees – forest, sapling, oak, timber, woods, leaves, seedling, topiary, thicket, park, trunk, branches, family, grove, pine, foliage.


“I think I’m paraphrasing here, “Destroying forests for economic gain is like burning a renaissance painting to cook a meal,”  a quote by the famous biologist and environmentalist, E. O. Wilson.   
When my daughter was small I would tell her stories about a cat named Biddles and his buddy, Mr. Squirrel.  They had many adventures as agents of the Dick Dobson Detective Agency.  Each adventure would start in Mr. Squirrels kitchen — high up in a towering loblolly pine.
I planted a tree with my grandfather in his yard when I was five years old.  That may be the single most important moment of my life.  I’ve sat under that tree sad, drunk, guilty and jubilant. The house was sold and torn down years ago.  I visit the tree every time I go back home.  It’s always glad to see me.  
I once knew a man in deep East Texas that owned a very big bulldozer.  He made his living clearing forest so that roads could be built to new oil wells.  One very hot, humid summer day he was clearing pine, magnolia, sweet gum, water oak, dogwood, sassafras.  He ran over a small pine tree.  It sprung back up and impaled him.  He sat, alone, impaled on that pine tree all day long.  He eventually was found and taken to the hospital.  He told me that there was no logical reason for him not dying that day.  He spent the rest of his days fighting oil and logging companies.
“His powerful arms rested on the oiled, chili red and sinewy as living flesh, mesquite table.  He seemed to say a gruff little prayer each time the flying blade would commence a new slice; proud as a new papa with every meaty board coming off the mill.” from “Uvalde” by Franklin Cincinnatus
The following is a passage from one of my favorite books, “A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek” by Annie Dillard: “When her doctor took her bandages off and led her into the garden, the girl who was no longer blind saw “the tree with the lights in it.” It was for this tree I searched through the peach orchards of summer, in the forests of fall and down winter and spring for years. Then one day I was walking along Tinker creek and thinking of nothing at all and I saw the tree with the lights in it. I saw the backyard cedar where the mourning doves roost charged and transfigured, each cell buzzing with flame. I stood on the grass with the lights in it, grass that was wholly fire, utterly focused and utterly dreamed. It was less like seeing that like being for the first time see, knocked breathless by a powerful glance. The flood of fire abated, but I’m still spending the power. Gradually the lights went out in the cedar, the colors died, the cells un-flamed and disappeared. I was still ringing. I had been my whole life a bell and never knew it until at that moment I was lifted and struck. I have since only very rarely seen the tree with the lights in it. The vision comes and goes, mostly goes, but I live for it, for the moment the mountains open and a new light roars in spate through the crack, and the mountains slam.”

Trees are the true families of earth.  
Thanks for listening,
Franklin Cincinnatus


JUROR | Michael Kenna will be the juror for “trees”.  He was born in Widnes, England in 1953. As one of 5 children born to a working class Irish-Catholic family, he initially aspired to enter the priesthood but his passion for the arts led him to The Banbury School of Art where he studied painting and then photography. Later he attended The London College of Printing and began working as a photographer and artist. He moved to San Francisco in 1977 where he was astounded by the number of galleries the city housed which allowed artists to showcase and sell their work. San Francisco has remained his home ever since.

Michael Kenna’s work has often been described as enigmatic, graceful and hauntingly beautiful much like the Japanese landscape. Kenna first visited Japan in 1987 for a one-person exhibition and was utterly seduced by the country’s terrain. Over the years he has traveled throughout almost the entire country constantly taking photographs. From these many treks the book Japan, featuring 95 of these photographs, was conceived.

The simplicity and clarity of Kenna’s Japan alludes to rather than describes his subject allowing the viewer to have a completely unique and tailored interpretation. He has described this body of work as, “more like a haiku rather than a prose”; his work being like photographs written in short poem form. Kenna’s photographs are often made at dawn or in the dark hours of night with exposures up to 10 hours. Kenna has said “you can’t always see what’s otherwise noticeable during the day… with long exposures you can photograph what the human eye is incapable to seeing”.

Michael Kenna’s prints have been shown in numerous exhibitions throughout the world with permanent collections in the Bibliotheque, Paris; The Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague; The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Kenna has also done a great deal of commercial work for such clients as Volvo, Rolls Royce, Audi, Sprint, Dom Perignon and The Spanish Tourist Board. Kenna to date has published 18 photography books.

SUBMISSION | Guidelines: Digital images should 1000 pixels on the longest side saved in JPEG format at 72 ppi. Each image should be labeled with consecutive numbers followed by your name, i.e. 1FirstName_LastName.jpg. The number should correspond with the number on the application form.  

SUBMISSION | Online: Fill out our online application to apply, send images, and make payment with Paypal. You will receive an email confirmation upon receiving the entry and payment. You can also fill and submit the online application, print out your confirmation email, and mail it with a check for your fees to the address below. 

SUBMISSION | Email: Email image files and submission form to amanda@asmithgallery.com. The gallery will send an email confirmation upon receiving the entry and payment.

SUBMISSION | Mail: CD’s and submission form should be mailed to:

A Smith Gallery
P O Box 175
103 N Nugent #175
Johnson City, TX 78636

The gallery will send an email confirmation upon receiving the entry and payment.

SUBMISSION | Entry Fee: $35 for the first 5 images, $6 per each additional image. Entries of 11 or more images are eligible for a review by the gallery directors.  Entry fees are not refundable.

ELIGIBILITY | Submissions are open to all photographers both professional and amateur working in all photographic mediums and styles. International entries are welcomed. Work that has been previously exhibited at A Smith Gallery is not eligible.

PRINTING/MATTING/FRAMING | information: The gallery offers printing, matting and framing services. If sending framed work, please use mats and frames that compliment your work and are appropriate in a gallery setting. Colored mats are discouraged. All images should be ready to hang with wires. Gallery wraps are acceptable. If you have any questions regarding appropriate presentation please contact amanda@asmithgallery.com.

AWARDS| The awards are as follows:

Jurors Award – $325.00
Directors Award – $250.00
Three Juror Honorable Mentions – an exhibition catalogue
Director Honorable Mentions chosen at the discretion of the Gallery Directors – an exhbition catalogue
Visitors Award – $100.00

SALES | The gallery will retain 40% of the sales price.

USE RIGHTS | Photographers retain full rights to their own images. The gallery will use the photographer’s images for publicity purposes as well as in the Blurb exhibition catalogue.

FOR MORE INFORMATION | amanda@asmithgallery.com